Our Team

The Project Managers of the Pancreatic Research Team (PCRT) are leaders in the field. The clinical care of patients battling pancreatic cancer requires a treatment approach that is fast and effective.

In coordination with PCRT physicians, the Project Managers and staff of PCRT work with the PCRT clinical institutions to implement cutting-edge clinical trials as rapidly as possible so that patients and their families receive the most effective treatment possible to beat this deadly disease.

The PCRT Support Team includes:

Amy Stoll-D'Astice Photo
Amy Stoll-D'Astice, MS, CCRP
PCRT Program Manager
Lynn Shemanski Photo
Lynn Shemanski, PhD
Director of Biostatistics
Patricia Ware Photo
Patricia Ware
Administrative Services Manager
Tammy Buist Photo
Tammy Buist, MBA
Chief Business Development Officer

Our Approach

Pancreatic cancer is a killer, but we believe its time has come. We bring the best people (physicians, lab researchers, and advocates) in the world together on ways to tackle this disease through new clinical therapies and innovative strategies.

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Clinical Trials

PCRT also initiates and coordinates cancer treatment studies (Clinical Trials) through a network of physicians at member and affiliated institutions. By partnering relationships with academic, clinical, and corporate entities, PCRT delivers these discoveries to the patient bedside as improved healthcare interventions. Achievement of this mission is accelerated and empowered through the refinements and breakthroughs in research techniques that span biomedical and genomic methodologies as well as computational biology.

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PCRT approaches pancreatic cancer head on

PCRT is composed of members who share the passion to make advances available to their patients as rapidly as possible. These members bring tremendous clinical trials experience and cutting edge technologies to the Team. Understanding why certain patients respond to treatment while the vast majority do not, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment strategies for patients with pancreatic cancer. PCRT approaches pancreatic cancer head on and utilizes the latest tools and technologies to complement the clinical evaluation process.

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The ultimate cure of this disease will develop through the integration of multiple researcher efforts and strategies

The Pancreatic Cancer Research Team (PCRT) is a non-profit organization whose goals are to improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with pancreatic cancer, and ultimately to eradicate and cure pancreatic cancer. It is an international collaborative organization formed by several world renowned institutions and researchers. PCRT conducts clinical trials in patients with pancreatic cancer, translating genomics research into prevention, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Our Science

The ultimate cure of this disease will develop through the integration of multiple researcher efforts and strategies.

The Pancreatic Cancer Research Team (PCRT) goal is to improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with pancreatic cancer, and ultimately to eradicate and cure pancreatic cancer. It is an international collaborative organization formed by several world renowned institutions and researchers. PCRT conducts clinical trials in patients with pancreatic cancer, translating genomics research into prevention, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Increased Survival in Pancreatic Cancer with nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine

FOLFIRINOX versus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

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Operational Headquarters and Statistical Center

Cancer Research And Biostatistics (CRAB) is the operational Headquarters for PCRT as well as PCRT's Statistical Center. Its primary role is to ensure the successful implementation of the clinical trial design through effective data management and Statistical Analysis.

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This includes the following capabilities:

  • Study design and statistical analysis
  • Customized Electronic Data Capture Systems
  • Data Management
  • Web site operations
  • Patient Enrollment and Registration
  • Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB)
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A Centralized Sample and Data Repository

Currently, there is no reliable marker for the detection of early pancreatic cancer. Clearly, the potential discovery of biomarkers associated with early disease will increase the success of early diagnosis, preventative and possibly curative treatments. The discovery of early recurrence biomarkers could facilitate the implementation of innovative early therapies, when the likelihood of success is higher.

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There is also no reliable serum marker to use for follow up of patients who are in treatment or one that can discriminate between patients with differences in response and survival. For patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, the discovery of novel molecular alterations present in pancreatic cancer cells will enable the discovery and development of novel drugs and therapeutic strategies to combat the disease.

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PCRT has created a multi-center Serum and DNA Repository for the discovery of biomarkers for this disease. The PCRT developed a clinical study designed to collect blood from people with pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, liver disease, and from healthy and at-risk volunteers in order to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. The samples are stored in a central repository or bank as a resource for current and future scientific studies. PCRT researchers use the samples to identify new biomarkers for early diagnosis, disease stage, natural history of the disease, response to treatment and to identify possible therapeutic interventions.

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In order to better understand this disease, the PCRT would like to expand this repository to collect tissue and images taken of current pancreatic cancer patients receiving treatment and use this data to discover how effectively current treatments work, and how to develop NEW treatments for pancreatic cancer patients at all stages of disease. We also want to use this very important data to identify biomarkers or changes in tissue (seen on a CT or PET scan) that might indicate early the onset of pancreatic cancer.